The French naturalist Pierre Sonnerat was the first to use the vernacular name “aye-aye” in 1782 when he described and illustrated the lemur, though it was also called the “long-fingered lemur” by English zoologist George Shaw in 1800—a name that did not stick. According to Sonnerat, the name “aye-aye” was a “cri d’exclamation & d’étonnement” (cry of exclamation and astonishment). However, American paleoanthropologist Ian Tattersall noted in 1982 that the name resembles the Malagasy name “hai hai” or “hay hay”, which is used around the island. According to Dunkel et al. (2012), the widespread use of the Malagasy name indicates that the name could not have come from Sonnerat. Another hypothesis proposed by Simons and Meyers (2001) is that it derives from “heh heh”, which is Malagasy for “I don’t know”. If correct, then the name might have originated from Malagasy people saying “heh heh” to avoid saying the name of a feared, magical animal.